Scott Seyfarth

CV (pdf)

I'm a linguist at New York University, where I'm a Visiting Assistant Professor for 2016-2017.

My research interests are in laboratory phonology, phonetics, and psycholinguistics.

I study how context and the relationships between words affects spoken word forms over the short- and long-run. I am also interested in the mental representation of morphological patterns. My recent work focuses on phonetic reduction and enhancement, voice quality and voicing acoustics, and paradigmatic effects in speech production.


Papers

Garellek, M., & Seyfarth, S. (2016). Acoustic differences between English /t/ glottalization and phrasal creak. Interspeech 2016. [ paper (pdf) ]

Seyfarth, S., Buz, E., & Jaeger, T. F. (2016). Dynamic hyperarticulation of coda voicing contrasts. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 139(2), EL31-37. [ doi ] [ paper (pdf) ]

Seyfarth, S. & Garellek, M. (2015). Coda glottalization in American English. Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. [ paper (pdf) ]

Malouf, R., Ackerman, F., & Seyfarth, S. (2015). Explaining the number hierarchy. Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. [ paper (pdf) ]

Seyfarth, S. (2014). Word informativity influences acoustic duration: Effects of contextual predictability on lexical representation. Cognition, 133(1), 140-155. [ doi ] [ paper (pdf) ]

Seyfarth, S. & Myslin, M. (2014). Discriminative learning predicts human recognition of English blend sources. Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. [ paper (pdf) ]

Seyfarth, S., Ackerman, F., & Malouf, R. (2014). Implicative organization facilitates morphological learning. Proceedings of the 40th Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society. [ abstract (pdf) ] [ paper (pdf) ]

Rohde, H., Seyfarth, S., Clark, B., Jäger, G., & Kaufmann, S. (2012). Communicating with cost-based implicature: a game-theoretic approach to ambiguity. Proceedings of the 16th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue. [ paper (pdf) ]


Presentations

Seyfarth, S., & Garellek, M. (2017). Plosive voicing acoustics and voice quality in Yerevan Armenian. Talk presented at the 41st Annual Penn Linguistics Conference. Philadelphia, PA.

Garellek, M., & Seyfarth, S. (2016). Acoustic comparison of /t/ glottalization and phrasal creak. Poster presented at the 171st Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. Salt Lake City, UT.

Seyfarth, S., Garellek, M., Malouf, R., & Ackerman, F. (2015). Acoustic differences in morphologically-distinct homophones. Talk presented at the 3rd American International Morphology Meeting. Amherst, MA.

Seyfarth, S., Buz, E., & Jaeger, T. F. (2015). Talkers selectively enhance informative duration contrasts. Poster presented at the 28th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. Los Angeles, CA. [ poster (pdf) ]

Malouf, R., Ackerman, F., & Seyfarth, S. (2014). Explaining the number hierarchy. Talk presented at the Workshop on Corpus Resources for Quantitative and Psycholinguistic Analysis. Eger, Hungary.

Seyfarth, S., Ackerman, F., & Malouf, R. (2014). Implicative organization facilitates morphological learning. Talk presented at the 16th International Morphology Meeting. Budapest, Hungary.

Seyfarth, S., & Sneller, E. (2014). Diachronic evidence for phonological reanalysis in New Zealand English /u/-fronting. Talk presented at the 38th Annual Penn Linguistics Conference. Philadelphia, PA.

Seyfarth, S., & Myslin, M. (2014). Discriminative learning predicts human recognition of English blend sources. Talk presented at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society. Berkeley, CA. [ abstract (pdf) ]

Seyfarth, S. (2013). Word informativity affects acoustic duration. Talk presented at the 19th Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing. Marseille, France.

Rohde, H., Seyfarth, S., Clark, B., Jäger, G., & Kaufmann, S. (2012). Cost and implicature in word use: Testing predictions of a game-theoretic model of alignment. Talk presented at the 25th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. New York, NY. [ abstract (pdf) ]


Resources

Python packages for linguistics:

Address

New York University
Linguistics Department
10 Washington Place Room 515
New York, NY 10003